A Brief Encounter with Asli Jaamac Muse Blog

serendipitously, Ayeeyo Asli//my grandmother came to america a couple of days before 9/11. she was bedazzazled with gold jewelry that had emerald stones and wore a thick african tunic dress that bore a heavy scent of ‘uud//incense. her blue eyes were -/weary/- the long flight, – /animated/- the reunion with her daughter after so long and -/haunted/- the civil war does things to you. she...

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RIS2016, BLM, and White Supremacy Blog

I have a few thoughts on a recent Reviving the Islamic Spirit 2016 (RIS2016) controversy that might be clarifying, or at least add to the intelligent discourse on the subject. First, let me start off by self-declaring as an African-Canadian Muslim, slightly removed from the direct reality of life as a black person in America, although inexorably drawn in due to the pull the United...

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#AskMaandeeq: Things We Wish We Knew in University Blog

Following our podcast this month on Somali experiences in higher education, we decided to ask some of our contributors a question that figured prominently in the discussion: What do you wish you knew in university? Here are some of the responses. *** My advice to young Somalis is: be yourself. There’s an assumption that you have to be polished and refined when you enter college/uni....

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PODCAST PHOTO Podcast

In this episode we discuss Ilhan Omar’s historic victory, K’Naan’s HBO series, what Donald Trump had to say about us, Somali experiences in education, the things we wish we knew in college, and more.


A Conversation with Muna Ahmed and Khadija Charif Blog / Featured

Muna Ahmed and Khadija Charif are two emerging Minnesota-based photographers. After attending their exhibits “Behind Both Fences” (Muna Ahmed) and “Jaded Youth” (Khadija Charif) on view at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs in Minneapolis this past April, we spoke more about their work. Safia Aidid: In “Jaded Youth” and “Behind Both Fences,” you both mediate on the tensions and contradictions of the Somali American...

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What Happened When K’naan Came to Cedar? Blog / Featured

Photo: Cedar Riverside, credit Burhan Mohamud As many of you know, on sunny Saturday afternoon, the West Bank Community Coalition held their annual block party. This year, musician K’naan Warsame would be in attendance. The event was set to take place in Cedar, a notable Somali community. K’naan was even scheduled to give a live performance. His arrival in the Twin-Cities, which holds the largest...

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About Maandeeq

Maandeeq (she who “satisfies the mind”) is the name of the female camel that symbolically represented the Somali nation in poetry. It was she who was looted under colonialism, retrieved by her rightful owners at independence in 1960, and mistreated by dictatorship, corruption and war.

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