Blog


People stand among damages at the scene of a blast after two car bombs exploded in Mogadishu on October 28, 2017.
A car packed with explosives blew up outside a hotel in Mogadishu on October 28 as a minibus also exploded at a nearby junction, with the emergency services reporting "many dead bodies". Witnesses reported hearing gunfire and said the entire area around the Nasa Hablod hotel was sealed off by security forces to keep people away. The blasts occurred just two weeks after a huge truck bombing in the Somali capital which killed at least 358 people, making it the deadliest attack in the country's history. 
 / AFP PHOTO / Mohamed ABDIWAHAB        (Photo credit should read MOHAMED ABDIWAHAB/AFP/Getty Images) Blog / Featured

On Oct. 14, I was participating in “Somali Studies in Canada: Resilience and Resistance,” a multidisciplinary colloquium held at Carleton University. It was the first of its kind in Canada, and more than 50 brilliant, bright and eager academics, artists, frontline workers, and grassroots activists from Ontario and Quebec gathered to discuss the Somali diaspora’s resilience and resistance over the past 30 years in Canada....

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A Conversation with Muna Ahmed and Khadija Charif Blog / Featured

Muna Ahmed and Khadija Charif are two emerging Minnesota-based photographers. After attending their exhibits “Behind Both Fences” (Muna Ahmed) and “Jaded Youth” (Khadija Charif) on view at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs in Minneapolis this past April, we spoke more about their work. Safia Aidid: In “Jaded Youth” and “Behind Both Fences,” you both mediate on the tensions and contradictions of the Somali American...

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What Happened When K’naan Came to Cedar? Blog / Featured

Photo: Cedar Riverside, credit Burhan Mohamud As many of you know, on sunny Saturday afternoon, the West Bank Community Coalition held their annual block party. This year, musician K’naan Warsame would be in attendance. The event was set to take place in Cedar, a notable Somali community. K’naan was even scheduled to give a live performance. His arrival in the Twin-Cities, which holds the largest...

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Hello from the Outside: Alien Citizen Liner Notes Blog / Featured

It’s September 2014 and I’m in an unlabeled room at O’Hare. I’m not allowed to use my cellphone, and have no signal anyway. My luggage is at my feet, my passport is in a terse custom agent’s hand. He unlocks and enters a white door, in a hallway of locked white doors. I promised my father I’d never lose sight of my passport. I’ll probably...

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Open for Submissions Blog / Featured

Maandeeq is always looking for original and innovative content. Our posts typically average 600-800 words. Take a look at the Maandeeq manifesto, blog posts and podcasts to get a sense of our style and audience: knowledgeable but accessible, informative, and critical. Our contributors identify as Somali, and write about a diverse array of topics relating to the Somali territories and diaspora. We encourage you to...

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My dining table/dissertation war room Blog

ABD. All But Dissertation. It’s the unofficial milestone all PhD students reach upon completing comprehensive exams and other program requirements needed to progress to PhD candidate status. I remember telling a friend who was unfamiliar with the structure of North American PhD programs what ABD meant. I had a good idea of the contours of what my dissertation topic would be and conducted preliminary research...

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Maandeeq Features: Sada Mire Features

Sada Mire is a Swedish-Somali archaeologist, art historian and presenter who currently serves as Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Archeology, Leiden University. She has previously headed up Somaliland’s Department of Antiquities, for the Ministry of Culture and Tourism examining cultural heritage sites. She was recently featured in PBS’s ‘Africa’s Great Civilizations’ in February 2017.  “People write me that if a refugee girl from Somalia...

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Homesickness Blog

I was always one of those passionate Somali youngsters. I’d never claim to be British, because for me a British person was overly competitive sore loser with passive-aggressive tendencies and an aversion to telling the truth. My Somali nature would brazenly opt for honesty over forced politeness. And well, being a Black refugee child taught me I had little room to be smug; which was the...

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A Brief Encounter with Asli Jaamac Muse Blog

serendipitously, Ayeeyo Asli//my grandmother came to america a couple of days before 9/11. she was bedazzazled with gold jewelry that had emerald stones and wore a thick african tunic dress that bore a heavy scent of ‘uud//incense. her blue eyes were -/weary/- the long flight, – /animated/- the reunion with her daughter after so long and -/haunted/- the civil war does things to you. she...

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RIS2016, BLM, and White Supremacy Blog

I have a few thoughts on a recent Reviving the Islamic Spirit 2016 (RIS2016) controversy that might be clarifying, or at least add to the intelligent discourse on the subject. First, let me start off by self-declaring as an African-Canadian Muslim, slightly removed from the direct reality of life as a black person in America, although inexorably drawn in due to the pull the United...

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#AskMaandeeq: Things We Wish We Knew in University Blog

Following our podcast this month on Somali experiences in higher education, we decided to ask some of our contributors a question that figured prominently in the discussion: What do you wish you knew in university? Here are some of the responses. *** My advice to young Somalis is: be yourself. There’s an assumption that you have to be polished and refined when you enter college/uni....

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